World Cup titbits: In Brazil , all amenities work

“It is a national calamity that we have to get over. We are yet to overcome some basic problems in the telecommunication sector,” said Adekunle Salami of the National Telegraph newspapers

Since arriving in Brazil for the world Cup, it has not been common seeing the residents clutching two to three phones as it is common sight in Nigeria, especially among the elite.
Some, who saw many Nigerians with two to three phones, had been left wondering why we had to be doing that.
“Some of the Nigerian journalists still around and indeed a few fans still around for the finals were not venturing explanations, saying it is still disgrace,” noted Tony Ubani of the Vanguard Newspapers in Lagos.
“It is a national calamity that we have to get over. We are yet to overcome some basic problems in the telecommunication sector,” said Adekunle Salami of the National Telegraph newspapers.
“I have had to hide my two phones so as to stop entertaining questions from curious Brazilians, who had been asking in the days of arrival in Sao Paulo for the ongoing World Cup,” Salami added.
Virtually all public infrastructure and utilities – water, electricity are working perfectly, without anyone needing to ask questions.
The speed and spread of internet connectivity as well as its consciousness is incredibly high.
This is, indeed, a surprise for many, including Nigerians, who had the wrong impressions that Brazil was still a third World country.
A nation, the size of Brazil, that is almost the size of West Africa, that has solved most of its basic needs like the ability to meet its food needs to no fewer than 200 million people, overcome electricity problems, rising to the challenge of insecurity, cannot be said to be a third world country.
This was a consensus of opinions expressed by many Nigerians, who came to Brazil for the World Cup. Odi Ikpeazu, President of Ikpeazu Redoutables of Onitsha, told the News Agency of Nigeria that most of the journeys to far-flung cities for the Super Eagles matches were undertaken at nights and yet no cases of robberies, mishaps and unnecessary stoppages by the security forces.
“They have used technology to telling effect, such that virtually within it can be accounted for,” Ikpeazu added.
Even with the efficient system of the telecoms, the authorities in Brazil said they met the demand for high volume and high quality connectivity during the ongoing 2014 FIFA World Cup through R$1.6 billion in public and private investments in telecommunications infrastructure.
They also invested another R$171 million in regulatory services investments in the sector.
“The good thing is not just that they spent the money, everybody could see where the money had been spent,” noted John Okeke, a businessman who had spent the last 15 years living in Brazil.

Comments